Digital Transformation without Stress

Digital Transformation without Stress: Part 2

Tom Meyers 2In part 1 of “Digital Transformation without Stress,” I addressed that technology has the potential to become a strong ally in our evolution. It will do this by becoming, just like the bodies autonomous nervous system, a part of our life that will perform a lot of tasks to help us to adapt with more ease to the changes in our environment without the need of our attention. Over time an algorithm will even be able to anticipate our needs.

What was once science fiction becomes science fact, and yes I’m looking forward and am excited about some of the developments. I’m for example excited about space travel, self-driving cars and an AI that can help me with my basic administrative tasks.

At the same time as an osteopath and body-centred stress coach, I see that not all these changes are without its challenges. Some are downright detrimental for our health, well-being and happiness.

For example change, positive or negative is always stressful and when stress is not managed, it will lead to illness. Not only physical problems like musculoskeletal pain, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, mental problems like concentration problems, anxiety and depression but also behavioural problems like short-temperedness, aggression and even radicalisation.

Another example is the less we start using our brain because more and more is automated and taken out of our hands, the less neuronal connections our brain makes. So, in other words, the brain becomes smaller, less resilient and the consequences detrimental. Already the brain has been getting smaller since the Stone Age

“Over the past 20,000 years, the average volume of the human male brain has decreased from 1,500 cubic centimetres to 1,350 cc, losing a chunk the size of a tennis ball.” (John Hawks)

In his latest book “21 Lessons for the 21st Century,” Yuval Noah Harari (author of Sapiens and Homo Deus) also refers to stress and mental resilience as challenges to our future that we need to find solutions for before it’s too late.

Mr Harari argues that on the one hand, the future of work is one that will need constant retraining, as a profession for life becomes something of the past. As regards to this observation he questions if human beings have the emotional stamina for a life of such continuous upheaval? On the other hand, he speculates that by 2050 a ‘useless’ class might emerge, not because of the lack of jobs but because of insufficient mental stamina.

His arguments are entirely in line with what I’ve been addressing in my presentation and workshops over the past couple of years.

In other words, emerging technologies like AI, IoT, robotics and automation will make life easier, but as human beings, we will need to find ways to compensate the lack of stimuli and physical, mental and spiritual challenges. Body-centred stress management will become even more important than it already is. Why body-centred because stress is foremost a physical adaptation response with at its basis neurological and hormonal changes that influence: blood flow, muscles, digestion, immunity but also psychological and social behaviour.

But stress management only will not suffice, and I will address my thoughts on this in  “Digital Transformation without Stress: Part 3

To be continued…

 


cropped-tom_meyers_p2Tom Meyers is a Belgian osteopath (BSc, D.O. OSD), Body-centred stress coach (M.ISMA) and founder of the Reaset Approach. As a speaker Tom’s talks centre around the topic of stress, viewed from a perspective of the future. A future in which technology has changed the world with a speed never seen before and has seen more changes in 20 years than over the last 300 years. In his first book “Futurize Yourself – Design your life on purpose” Tom recounts his personal how three questions saved his life, gave him a sense of purpose and why having a sense of purpose matters in a digital transformed and more automated future.


 

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Digital Transformation without Stress

Digital Transformation without Stress: Part 1

099New technologies are changing the way we live and work with a speed and scope unlike anything humanity has experienced before.

For example:

  • Soon you will not be driving to work but being driven as cars will increase being automated, less pollutive as they are electric and traffic jams something of the past.
  • Advances in speech technology will have us talk more and more to our digital devices and replace typing commands. Your personal AI will become your best friend, your therapist, your personal secretary and personal shopper and style consultant.
  • With the Internet of Things (IoT) that will connect everything and anything, lights will switch on automatically wherever you go and off when you leave. You won’t need an employee ID card anymore to walk into your office, and at every moment of the day your location and activity, that of your partner and kids and anything connected can be monitored in real time.

So in many ways, we’re experiencing an amazing time in human history. A time where emerging technologies will provide us with new means to make life easier and contribute to making the way we work and produce anything more sustainable and cost-effective.

Like the bodies autonomous nervous system – our control system that acts mostly unconsciously and regulates essential bodily functions – technology has the potential, when it continues to become more performant, to be our control system that will help us to adapt (1) with more ease to our environment and over time even anticipate our needs (2).

With adaptability being a key component of evolution we can thus take in consideration that technology might be just part of a natural process. An evolutionary process comparable to when single-celled organisms started to collaborate and evolved into multi-cellular life forms because cells who were working together benefited more from doing so than they did from living alone (3).

On the other hand, while technology is and will continue to contribute to our adaptability and evolution, there are however some adverse effects that need to be taken into account and acted upon. Here are three that are at the forefront of my mind and which will cause additional stress when not addressed during the digital transformation:

The adverse effect on jobs:

When work processes and production of goods are increasingly being optimised and become more efficient, fewer people are needed to perform the same task. So some people will lose their job and require to learn new skills which in itself isn’t without its challenges.

Stressors are the loss of your job, financial insecurity, having to learn new skills, losing colleagues, more responsibility, increase in demands with less resources…

The effect on security:

There are many ethical aspects to be considered regarding what is done with the data that is collected as it can be used for other purposes than for our benefit.

Stressors are the misuse of your data, being manipulated, over-consumption…

The effect on health and well-being:

When more and more parts of our life are automated, we may not forget to keep stimulating the brain. The brain is just like a muscle – use it or lose it – and losing brain mass means it becomes less resilient, it has an effect on memory, creativity, productivity and behavior.

Stressors are increased stress, being more prone for illnesses or accidents, depression, burnout, losing your job because of under-performance or chronic illness…

>>> continue reading part 2


cropped-tom_meyers_p2Tom Meyers is a Belgian osteopath (BSc, D.O. OSD), Body-centred stress coach (M.ISMA) and founder of the Reaset Approach. As a speaker Tom’s talks centre around the topic of stress, viewed from a perspective of the future. A future in which technology has changed the world with a speed never seen before and has seen more changes in 20 years than over the last 300 years. In his first book “Futurize Yourself – Design your life on purpose” Tom recounts his personal how three questions saved his life, gave him a sense of purpose and why having a sense of purpose matters in a digital transformed and more automated future.


References:

1) Humanification by Christian Kromme: http://www.christiankromme.com

2) Thinking Like a Human: What It Means to Give AI a Theory of Mind: https://goo.gl/EapcNg

3) How did multicellular life evolve: https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/news/how-did-multicellular-life-evolve/